Atchoo! Allergy season has arrived

Ali Chiavetta
Features Writer

Pollen is in the air now that trees and flowers are coming out of winter hibernation, so learning how to deal with allergies is a must.

Pollen is in the air now that trees and flowers are coming out of winter hibernation, so learning how to deal with allergies is a must.

It’s that magical time of year again when the birds are chirping, the sun is out…and grass and pollen are flying around everywhere.
For many people, this is allergy season.
According to The Weather Channel, this season is going to be one of the worst for allergies. Just this week alone, most of the days are in the “High Risk” range in The Weather Channel’s PollenCast. On The Weather Channel’s website, they list a number of seemingly unusual things that you can do to reduce your allergy symptoms.
If you’re usually a morning shower-taker, you may want to rethink. Taking showers at night can wash out all of the pollen and dust that may have found its way into your hair during the day. It sounds unpleasant, but any time you walk outside, you are susceptible to pollen sticking to your hair and clothing. By washing out all of the pollen at night, you are free to use mousses or gels in the morning to style your hair, without worrying about pollen residue getting trapped.

While it may not be immediately obvious, trees disperse pollen as well as flowers. These pollens cause allergies for some of the population along with flower pollen.

While it may not be immediately obvious, trees disperse pollen as well as flowers. These pollens cause allergies for some of the population along with flower pollen.

Stress levels are known to correlate with allergic reactions, so by doing stress-reducing activities, you may also be reducing your vulnerability to allergens. By taking a bath, reading a book or even listening to calming music, you reduce the chances of allergies wreaking havoc on your system.
If natural remedies aren’t helping your situation, there is always the possibility of taking an antihistamine like Claritin or Zyrtec. Though these medicines are over-the-counter, they should still be taken with caution and after reading the warning labels thoroughly. Most of these medications warn about drowsiness being a major side effect, so don’t take these before heading off to class.
If your allergies are worse indoors, it may be due to dust mites in the air. Dust mites love living in warm and moist environments. To help reduce the chances of these dust mites inhabiting your bedroom, keep your room as cool and dry as possible.
Another way to keep your bedroom allergy-free is to wash your sheets and bedding in boiling hot water. This can kill bacteria and other dust mites that may cause your allergy symptoms to get worse inside.

The Weather Channel offers pollen maps and forecasts to alert you to the amount of pollen in the air for the week. The higher levels of pollen are indicated by red.

The Weather Channel offers pollen maps and forecasts to alert you to the amount of pollen in the air for the week. The higher levels of pollen are indicated by red.

For those of you that own smartphones, there is an app called AllergyManager. This app lets you know how bad the allergy conditions are outside and what symptoms you can expect. This will give you a heads-up before heading to class to know how high the pollen levels are.
There’s a myth about reducing allergies that may seem crazy to some but worthwhile to others! The rumor says that if you eat local honey from the region you’re living in, your body will become more immune to the allergens in that area. To some, that may sound crazy. To those who suffer from terrible allergies every year, it may be something to try out!
While there are no complete cures for allergy sufferers, there are lots of natural remedies to try as well as over-the-counter and prescription medicinal remedies. Hopefully some of these solutions will ease your pain this allergy season!