Liberty in North Korea: traveling for a cause

Nicole Schaffer
Features Writer

Sean Ferry, in the front second from the left , traveled with a group of three to four people from LINK, sharing a documentary in high schools and churches which showed the situation in North Korea.

Sean Ferry, in the front second from the left, traveled with a group of three to four people from LINK, sharing a documentary in high schools and churches which showed the situation in North Korea.

“A philosophy I live by in life is to be a good person and to do things for others,” says Millersville junior Sean Ferry, who has been involved in the organization Liberty in North Korea (LINK) for the past two years. While Ferry may live by these words today, two years ago he was focusing on studying as a communications major at MU and had never heard of the organization.
Deciding to take some time off of school, Ferry wanted to pursue traveling with a band. However, when this plan backfired, he was unsure of what to do with his life. “After a month of being off from school had passed, I was getting worried. So when I heard from a friend about the organization, I looked into the North Korean crisis, and decided to become involved.” So began Ferry’s time on the road for a year and a half he would never forget.
Founded in 2004, LINK is an organization that was created to protect and aid North Korean refugees and help spread awareness of the ongoing crisis. By joining this organization, Ferry became a “nomad,” which means that he would travel the United States as well as British Columbia, with three or four other people and share a documentary that tells the story of North Korean survivors that have journeyed across the border into China.
With LINK, Ferry trekked to various high schools, colleges, churches, and even coffee shops to tell the story of the North Korean refugees. A bonus to interning with this organization was the travel time, which fulfilled Ferry’s longing to see unfamiliar places and meet new people.
Ultimately, joining this organization has opened his eyes to the world and helped Ferry feel as though he has a purpose in life. “I like that I am doing what I think is a good thing. I like knowing that I am helping to save lives, and am directly impacting the North Korean people. Seeing others inspiration, is what inspires me,” he said.
Now that Ferry has returned to school, he continues to try to support the organization he cares so much about. There are different things that everyone is able to do that can support LINK, he says. By donating on the organization’s website, libertyinnorthkorea.org, you can help continue the mission of providing aid to refugees. A way to get involved in the organization is through creating a rescue team with which you can host events to raise funds, or by interning as a nomad or working in the office.
After having such an amazing experience, Ferry hopes to raise awareness of the North Korean crisis at MU through the creation of a club to shed light on the issue and raise funds for the organization. After Ferry graduates, he wants to continue working in the non-profit field and hopes to one day open up his own community center.